Research Project Title

Mitigating Dioxin Formation from Lignocellulose Combustion: An Experimental and Computational Approach

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

Incomplete combustion of lignocellulose (wood) is a known source of carcinogenic dioxins. Can we improve wood combustion and decrease dioxin formation? We are working both experimentally and computationally to tackle this question. Experimentally, we are varying organic and inorganic additives to wood and testing for increases/decreases in dioxin formation. From a rational design perspective, we are computationally looking for an exploitable detail of the dioxin mechanism to also achieve this goal. The commonly reported pathways for dioxin formation involve building dioxins from smaller parts with varying starting points. While these are “bottom-up” pathways for dioxin formation, no studies have investigated a potential “top-down” pathway to directly produce dioxin from lignocellulose. In pursuit of a “top-down” mechanism, we are assessing the impact of the lignocellulose matrix on a direct mechanism for dioxin formation. Progress toward these goals is reported here.

Session Number

PS1

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS1-y

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Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:45 AM

Mitigating Dioxin Formation from Lignocellulose Combustion: An Experimental and Computational Approach

HUB Multipurpose Room

Incomplete combustion of lignocellulose (wood) is a known source of carcinogenic dioxins. Can we improve wood combustion and decrease dioxin formation? We are working both experimentally and computationally to tackle this question. Experimentally, we are varying organic and inorganic additives to wood and testing for increases/decreases in dioxin formation. From a rational design perspective, we are computationally looking for an exploitable detail of the dioxin mechanism to also achieve this goal. The commonly reported pathways for dioxin formation involve building dioxins from smaller parts with varying starting points. While these are “bottom-up” pathways for dioxin formation, no studies have investigated a potential “top-down” pathway to directly produce dioxin from lignocellulose. In pursuit of a “top-down” mechanism, we are assessing the impact of the lignocellulose matrix on a direct mechanism for dioxin formation. Progress toward these goals is reported here.