Research Project Title

Materials Engineering, Investment Casting, and Additive Manufacturing as an Intersection of Visual Art

Session Type

Traditional Paper Presentation

Research Project Abstract

The purpose of this research was to explore the intersection of visual art and engineering by investigating the use of the manufacturing processes, investment casting and additive manufacturing in sculpture making. In order to do this, a sculpture was created using the following engineering technologies: SolidWorks, an engineering 3D modelling program, and 3D printing. The sculpture was based on the movements of the dance Lily, which was created by Loïe Fuller in the late 19th century, and restaged by Jessica Lindberg Coxe and Megan Slayter. The sculpture is intended to be manufactured using investment casting techniques, which would be the next step in this research project. Challenges in additive manufacturing and how it is applied to visual art include issues with undercuts, resolution, post-processing and design. The research considered these challenges and sought to create a 3D model that would not require scaffolding that would mar the surface finish. The research also included modifications to the model to take into account the tolerances of the 3D printer.

Session Number

RS8

Location

Weyerhaueser 303

Abstract Number

RS8-c

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:30 PM

Materials Engineering, Investment Casting, and Additive Manufacturing as an Intersection of Visual Art

Weyerhaueser 303

The purpose of this research was to explore the intersection of visual art and engineering by investigating the use of the manufacturing processes, investment casting and additive manufacturing in sculpture making. In order to do this, a sculpture was created using the following engineering technologies: SolidWorks, an engineering 3D modelling program, and 3D printing. The sculpture was based on the movements of the dance Lily, which was created by Loïe Fuller in the late 19th century, and restaged by Jessica Lindberg Coxe and Megan Slayter. The sculpture is intended to be manufactured using investment casting techniques, which would be the next step in this research project. Challenges in additive manufacturing and how it is applied to visual art include issues with undercuts, resolution, post-processing and design. The research considered these challenges and sought to create a 3D model that would not require scaffolding that would mar the surface finish. The research also included modifications to the model to take into account the tolerances of the 3D printer.