Research Project Title

The Unnatural Becoming Natural: How Mistress Eyre Creates Spatial Power in the Transitional City

Session Type

Traditional Paper Presentation

Research Project Abstract

In Thomas Dekker’s city comedy The Shoemaker’s Holiday, Early Modern London and the workshop provide a distinct physical space where Margery Eyre is able to go beyond being a presence that is insignificant, and become a necessity to the shoemaking operation. I analyze how Margery uses her own physical and social space in order to insert herself into traditionally masculine roles. In these instances, there is a particular sort of space where she is able to assert an act of subjectivity. I furthermore examine similar connections between space, gender, and modernity in Whit Stillman’s The Last Days of Disco.

Session Number

RS5

Location

Weyerhaeuser 203

Abstract Number

RS5-d

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Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:30 PM

The Unnatural Becoming Natural: How Mistress Eyre Creates Spatial Power in the Transitional City

Weyerhaeuser 203

In Thomas Dekker’s city comedy The Shoemaker’s Holiday, Early Modern London and the workshop provide a distinct physical space where Margery Eyre is able to go beyond being a presence that is insignificant, and become a necessity to the shoemaking operation. I analyze how Margery uses her own physical and social space in order to insert herself into traditionally masculine roles. In these instances, there is a particular sort of space where she is able to assert an act of subjectivity. I furthermore examine similar connections between space, gender, and modernity in Whit Stillman’s The Last Days of Disco.