Research Project Title

Shattering the Systemic Glass Ceiling: Gender Differences in Leadership

Session Type

Traditional Paper Presentation

Research Project Abstract

Abstract Gender role stereotypes are breaking, from women assertion their way into a traditional man’s work world to men becoming stay at home dads. However, these changes are not translating to leadership roles for women. Why are women not typically seen in leadership roles? Past research shows a strong correlation between males and leadership role identification. The present study examines whether preference for males in leadership roles is maintained, when gender specific leadership styles are identified. Undergraduate participants (N = 42, 11 male, 31 female) read four counterbalanced vignettes looking at gender consistent and gender inconsistent leadership styles. Then they completed surveys, measuring leadership perception of the leaders in each vignette. Although not significant, inconsistent leadership styles were preferred over consistent styles and when gender inconsistent leadership styles were present females were preferred over males. Results did not support the hypothesis’ that gender consistent leadership styles and male leaders in the presence of inconsistent leadership styles, would be preferred. Future research should look at this relationship in gender dominated industries and across multiple generations.

Session Number

RS2

Location

Weyerhaeuser 204

Abstract Number

RS2-a

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Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:45 AM

Shattering the Systemic Glass Ceiling: Gender Differences in Leadership

Weyerhaeuser 204

Abstract Gender role stereotypes are breaking, from women assertion their way into a traditional man’s work world to men becoming stay at home dads. However, these changes are not translating to leadership roles for women. Why are women not typically seen in leadership roles? Past research shows a strong correlation between males and leadership role identification. The present study examines whether preference for males in leadership roles is maintained, when gender specific leadership styles are identified. Undergraduate participants (N = 42, 11 male, 31 female) read four counterbalanced vignettes looking at gender consistent and gender inconsistent leadership styles. Then they completed surveys, measuring leadership perception of the leaders in each vignette. Although not significant, inconsistent leadership styles were preferred over consistent styles and when gender inconsistent leadership styles were present females were preferred over males. Results did not support the hypothesis’ that gender consistent leadership styles and male leaders in the presence of inconsistent leadership styles, would be preferred. Future research should look at this relationship in gender dominated industries and across multiple generations.