Research Project Title

Discrimination in the U.S. Political Asylum Process

Session Type

Traditional Paper Presentation

Research Project Abstract

The opportunity to gain permanent solace in the United States is desirable for millions of refugees from around the world, especially for those who originate from Central America. However, according to several sources, the United States rejects most applications of asylum-seekers from Central America. The disparity between acceptance of Central Americans and other countries leads me to believe that the United States discriminates against asylum-seekers based on national identity. In order to determine whether or not the United States is holding to its international obligations to provide aid in the worldwide refugee crisis, I will answer the following question: Does the United States political asylum process discriminate against refugees on the basis of their national identity to the extent that the United States violates international law? I hypothesize that the United States is preferential in granting political asylum on the basis of national identity, which violates international obligations and humanitarian rights under principles of international law. In order to reveal the truth in this claim, I will provide a general definition of political asylum, according to international agreements, norms, and policies. Next, I will describe what is specific to the United States in regard to the political asylum process and its laws, noting case precedent that has significantly impacted the political asylum policies of the United States. I will then examine cases and articles that help answer my research question. Lastly, I will offer predictions and advice for the future discourse of political asylum in relation to international law.

Session Number

RS13

Location

Weyerhaeuser 303

Abstract Number

RS13-d

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Apr 28th, 2:15 PM Apr 28th, 3:45 PM

Discrimination in the U.S. Political Asylum Process

Weyerhaeuser 303

The opportunity to gain permanent solace in the United States is desirable for millions of refugees from around the world, especially for those who originate from Central America. However, according to several sources, the United States rejects most applications of asylum-seekers from Central America. The disparity between acceptance of Central Americans and other countries leads me to believe that the United States discriminates against asylum-seekers based on national identity. In order to determine whether or not the United States is holding to its international obligations to provide aid in the worldwide refugee crisis, I will answer the following question: Does the United States political asylum process discriminate against refugees on the basis of their national identity to the extent that the United States violates international law? I hypothesize that the United States is preferential in granting political asylum on the basis of national identity, which violates international obligations and humanitarian rights under principles of international law. In order to reveal the truth in this claim, I will provide a general definition of political asylum, according to international agreements, norms, and policies. Next, I will describe what is specific to the United States in regard to the political asylum process and its laws, noting case precedent that has significantly impacted the political asylum policies of the United States. I will then examine cases and articles that help answer my research question. Lastly, I will offer predictions and advice for the future discourse of political asylum in relation to international law.