Research Project Title

Navigating Gender and Sexual Identity in a "Straight" World: A Study of How LGBTQ+ College Students Talk about Romantic Relationships

Session Type

Traditional Paper Presentation

Research Project Abstract

The application of heteronormative social norms in society is a tendency that, despite progression in civil rights and equality, still persists in our world today. Becker’s Labeling Theory serves as an explanation of how norms are applied, and how, because of labeling, people to which they are applied are forced to perpetuate certain characteristics that may or may not be conflicting with their identities. This theory begins to address the overall dynamic of interactions between members of the LGBTQ+ and heterosexual communities that arises from the labeling process. This study will use it as the foundation to explore the application of social norms regarding sexual and gender identities as they affect one specific interaction, conversations regarding romantic relationships. I will collect data from a sample of 15 LGBTQ+ individuals by conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews. Interview protocol includes background information about the participant’s romantic relationship history, and conversations they feel comfortable having with their heterosexual peers about the topic.

Session Number

RS11

Location

Weyerhaeuser 204

Abstract Number

RS11-d

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Apr 28th, 2:15 PM Apr 28th, 3:45 PM

Navigating Gender and Sexual Identity in a "Straight" World: A Study of How LGBTQ+ College Students Talk about Romantic Relationships

Weyerhaeuser 204

The application of heteronormative social norms in society is a tendency that, despite progression in civil rights and equality, still persists in our world today. Becker’s Labeling Theory serves as an explanation of how norms are applied, and how, because of labeling, people to which they are applied are forced to perpetuate certain characteristics that may or may not be conflicting with their identities. This theory begins to address the overall dynamic of interactions between members of the LGBTQ+ and heterosexual communities that arises from the labeling process. This study will use it as the foundation to explore the application of social norms regarding sexual and gender identities as they affect one specific interaction, conversations regarding romantic relationships. I will collect data from a sample of 15 LGBTQ+ individuals by conducting semi-structured in-depth interviews. Interview protocol includes background information about the participant’s romantic relationship history, and conversations they feel comfortable having with their heterosexual peers about the topic.