Research Project Title

A Feminist Interreligious Intervention: Transforming the Abortion Debate into a Dialogue on Life

Session Type

Traditional Paper Presentation

Research Project Abstract

This thesis aims at turning the abortion debate into a dialogue that recognizes women’s voices, is grounded in humility, and has the possibility for mutual transformation. With this task, a feminist perspective applied to Cornille’s necessary conditions for interreligious dialogue are helpful. These include humility, commitment, interconnection, empathy, and hospitality with feminist ideas of hybrid identity and relationality. As non-Christians are usually considered “others” and share experiences of marginalization and exclusion from Roman Catholic knowledge systems and dialogues, I call for these interreligious dialogue conditions to become necessary in the abortion dialogue between the Church and women, who are frequently excluded from the conversation similarly to the religious other. I hope that applying these interreligious dialogical conditions will allow for a holier, richer understanding and application of the doctrine of the sanctity of life that aligns with Pope Francis’ vision of a culture of mercy and accompaniment.

Session Number

RS10

Location

Weyerhaeuser 203

Abstract Number

RS10-b

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Apr 28th, 2:15 PM Apr 28th, 3:45 PM

A Feminist Interreligious Intervention: Transforming the Abortion Debate into a Dialogue on Life

Weyerhaeuser 203

This thesis aims at turning the abortion debate into a dialogue that recognizes women’s voices, is grounded in humility, and has the possibility for mutual transformation. With this task, a feminist perspective applied to Cornille’s necessary conditions for interreligious dialogue are helpful. These include humility, commitment, interconnection, empathy, and hospitality with feminist ideas of hybrid identity and relationality. As non-Christians are usually considered “others” and share experiences of marginalization and exclusion from Roman Catholic knowledge systems and dialogues, I call for these interreligious dialogue conditions to become necessary in the abortion dialogue between the Church and women, who are frequently excluded from the conversation similarly to the religious other. I hope that applying these interreligious dialogical conditions will allow for a holier, richer understanding and application of the doctrine of the sanctity of life that aligns with Pope Francis’ vision of a culture of mercy and accompaniment.