Research Project Title

Sediment Characteristics in Riverbed and Upland Soil in the Little Spokane River

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

The Little Spokane River is an important resource in the Spokane county, Washington; supplying drinking water to about 500,000 people. In this study, pH, total organ carbon, bulk density, cation ion exchange capacity, percent moisture, and composition were measured in riverbed sediment and upland soils in the catchment with the aim of helping to assist their influence on pollutants in the river. pH was measured by hatch model pH meter, total organic carbon by digestion in muffler (105 and 360 degree C) bulk density by dried (105 degree C) weight loss over volume of cylinder, water content by weight loss by drying at (105 degree C) and composition by clay, sand, and silt content. Results from the study indicated that sediment and upland soil from the river catchment met Washington State quality standards and therefore could not be said to be a contributing factor to pollution.

Session Number

PS3

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS3-q

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COinS
 
Apr 28th, 2:15 PM Apr 28th, 3:45 PM

Sediment Characteristics in Riverbed and Upland Soil in the Little Spokane River

HUB Multipurpose Room

The Little Spokane River is an important resource in the Spokane county, Washington; supplying drinking water to about 500,000 people. In this study, pH, total organ carbon, bulk density, cation ion exchange capacity, percent moisture, and composition were measured in riverbed sediment and upland soils in the catchment with the aim of helping to assist their influence on pollutants in the river. pH was measured by hatch model pH meter, total organic carbon by digestion in muffler (105 and 360 degree C) bulk density by dried (105 degree C) weight loss over volume of cylinder, water content by weight loss by drying at (105 degree C) and composition by clay, sand, and silt content. Results from the study indicated that sediment and upland soil from the river catchment met Washington State quality standards and therefore could not be said to be a contributing factor to pollution.