Research Project Title

Examining the Factors That Contribute to Faster and Slower Regional High School Cross Country Times in the United States of America

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

Studies regarding cross-country are hard to come by, but in the running community it is widely accepted that different regions of the country are faster and some are slower. The purpose of this study is to provide new information as to the variables contributing to the differences in times across regions for high school cross-country. This study utilizes data from athletic.net, a website holding 5,000 meter race times for high school boys and girls around the United States. Previous studies suggest that higher competition and cooler race temperatures lead to faster race times. In accordance with the previous literature, three of the variables examined across regions were gender, total regional population, and average regional temperature. With this in mind, as well as average regional per capita income, grade of an athlete, and average regional temperature during the cross-country season (autumn), this study suggests that each variable is highly significant to race times across regions.

Session Number

PS3

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS3-j

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COinS
 
Apr 28th, 2:15 PM Apr 28th, 3:45 PM

Examining the Factors That Contribute to Faster and Slower Regional High School Cross Country Times in the United States of America

HUB Multipurpose Room

Studies regarding cross-country are hard to come by, but in the running community it is widely accepted that different regions of the country are faster and some are slower. The purpose of this study is to provide new information as to the variables contributing to the differences in times across regions for high school cross-country. This study utilizes data from athletic.net, a website holding 5,000 meter race times for high school boys and girls around the United States. Previous studies suggest that higher competition and cooler race temperatures lead to faster race times. In accordance with the previous literature, three of the variables examined across regions were gender, total regional population, and average regional temperature. With this in mind, as well as average regional per capita income, grade of an athlete, and average regional temperature during the cross-country season (autumn), this study suggests that each variable is highly significant to race times across regions.