Research Project Title

Sleep Disturbances in Pathological Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Drosophila melanogaster Model

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

Sleep disturbances are common in neurodegenerative diseases and may be a clinical factor in disease etiology. ALS patients have been reported to get either insufficient sleep or sleep that is low in quality. However, the reasons for sleep issues in ALS are unclear. Recent studies suggest that there are genetic mechanisms associated with ALS that have been shown to be implicated in sleep problems. In this study, we investigated a Drosophila ALS Model for sleep deficits, which have not previously been characterized. In order to evaluate sleep disturbances in Drosophila ALS models, the Drosophila Activity Monitoring System (DAMS) was utilized. Preliminary data suggested increased day time bout duration in a pathological ALS mutant compared to controls. These studies suggest that fly models of ALS may reveal mechanistic clues in regard to the possible relationship between sleep and disease. Future studies examining sleep in ALS fly models with genetic and/or pharmacological screening may prove to be beneficial for therapeutic strategies targeting ALS.

Session Number

PS2

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS2-v

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COinS
 
Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:30 PM

Sleep Disturbances in Pathological Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Drosophila melanogaster Model

HUB Multipurpose Room

Sleep disturbances are common in neurodegenerative diseases and may be a clinical factor in disease etiology. ALS patients have been reported to get either insufficient sleep or sleep that is low in quality. However, the reasons for sleep issues in ALS are unclear. Recent studies suggest that there are genetic mechanisms associated with ALS that have been shown to be implicated in sleep problems. In this study, we investigated a Drosophila ALS Model for sleep deficits, which have not previously been characterized. In order to evaluate sleep disturbances in Drosophila ALS models, the Drosophila Activity Monitoring System (DAMS) was utilized. Preliminary data suggested increased day time bout duration in a pathological ALS mutant compared to controls. These studies suggest that fly models of ALS may reveal mechanistic clues in regard to the possible relationship between sleep and disease. Future studies examining sleep in ALS fly models with genetic and/or pharmacological screening may prove to be beneficial for therapeutic strategies targeting ALS.