Research Project Title

Concentration of Hydrogen as a Function of Thickness of 304 Stainless Tensile Specimen

Presenter Information

Joe Wilson, Gonzaga UniversityFollow

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

When certain metals are exposed to a hydrogen rich environment, the mechanical properties of these metals can be effected. This happens because the hydrogen molecules are small enough to make their way into the spaces between the lattice structures within the metal and become lodged within the lattice’s, restricting dislocation movement and thus effecting the properties of the metal, causing the metal to act in a much more brittle fashion. However, once the metal is removed from the hydrogen rich environment, the hydrogen begins to diffuse out of the metal. However, even after being removed from a hydrogen rich environment, some metals still retain the more brittle material properties, suggesting that the hydrogen did not diffuse out completely. My research goal is to investigate exactly how much hydrogen is retained inside a specimen of 304 stainless sheet metal as a function of depth within the specimen. This will be accomplished by using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which has the ability to determine the chemical makeup of a material at varying depths throughout the material. By testing specimen exposed to no hydrogen, approximately 1 atm of hydrogen, and 20,000 psi of hydrogen over a set period of time, I will hopefully be able to determine the concentration of hydrogen throughout 304 stainless sheet metal as a function of the materials thickness.

Session Number

PS2

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS2-u

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COinS
 
Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:30 PM

Concentration of Hydrogen as a Function of Thickness of 304 Stainless Tensile Specimen

HUB Multipurpose Room

When certain metals are exposed to a hydrogen rich environment, the mechanical properties of these metals can be effected. This happens because the hydrogen molecules are small enough to make their way into the spaces between the lattice structures within the metal and become lodged within the lattice’s, restricting dislocation movement and thus effecting the properties of the metal, causing the metal to act in a much more brittle fashion. However, once the metal is removed from the hydrogen rich environment, the hydrogen begins to diffuse out of the metal. However, even after being removed from a hydrogen rich environment, some metals still retain the more brittle material properties, suggesting that the hydrogen did not diffuse out completely. My research goal is to investigate exactly how much hydrogen is retained inside a specimen of 304 stainless sheet metal as a function of depth within the specimen. This will be accomplished by using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), which has the ability to determine the chemical makeup of a material at varying depths throughout the material. By testing specimen exposed to no hydrogen, approximately 1 atm of hydrogen, and 20,000 psi of hydrogen over a set period of time, I will hopefully be able to determine the concentration of hydrogen throughout 304 stainless sheet metal as a function of the materials thickness.