Research Project Title

Efficacy of Pyrantel Pamoate in Canines with Small v.s. Large Genetic Variability

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

Parasitic egg count and types in canines at the Spokane Humane Society (SHS) and at a breeder in Seattle, Washington were compared. Both parties utilized dewormers containing Pyrantel pamoate as their active ingredient. The presence and type of parasite found were determined by fecal flotation. Parasitic infections were identified in 3 of the 12 subjects from the Spokane Humane Society, and 5 of the 8 samples from the breeder. The samples from the SHS were collected from mixed breed canines, while the breeder’s samples were from canines that were either purebred or were born of a purebred match. The variability of parasitic infections from the breeder were higher than the SHS. These results support the hypothesis that a lack in genetic variability within the breeder’s samples would allow for a wider range of parasitic infection. A possible explanation is that lack of genetic variability prevents canines from successfully combating parasites due to a less advanced immune response. Therefore, genetic variability in canines is important for proper and successful immune response to parasitic infection.

Session Number

PS1

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS1-o

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Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:45 AM

Efficacy of Pyrantel Pamoate in Canines with Small v.s. Large Genetic Variability

HUB Multipurpose Room

Parasitic egg count and types in canines at the Spokane Humane Society (SHS) and at a breeder in Seattle, Washington were compared. Both parties utilized dewormers containing Pyrantel pamoate as their active ingredient. The presence and type of parasite found were determined by fecal flotation. Parasitic infections were identified in 3 of the 12 subjects from the Spokane Humane Society, and 5 of the 8 samples from the breeder. The samples from the SHS were collected from mixed breed canines, while the breeder’s samples were from canines that were either purebred or were born of a purebred match. The variability of parasitic infections from the breeder were higher than the SHS. These results support the hypothesis that a lack in genetic variability within the breeder’s samples would allow for a wider range of parasitic infection. A possible explanation is that lack of genetic variability prevents canines from successfully combating parasites due to a less advanced immune response. Therefore, genetic variability in canines is important for proper and successful immune response to parasitic infection.