Research Project Title

Injury-related Anxiety as a Psychological Barrier in Return to Play

Session Type

Poster Presentation

Research Project Abstract

Injury-related Anxiety as a Psychological Barrier in Return to Play Bartlett OC, Wright CJ: Whitworth University Context: Injury in collegiate athletics is widely accepted as inevitable, and reinjury of the same structure is often an anxiety even after full rehabilitation. Fear of injury, or reinjury, can result in both psychological and physiological changes that can ultimately increase the risk of actual injury. Therefore, it is important to recognize and quantify the psychological aspects of injury when determining individual readiness to return to play (RTP). Objective: The purpose of this research study is to measure fear and/or anxiety regarding reinjury in returning to intercollegiate football participation after sustaining a sport-related injury. Design: Cohort. Setting: Athletic Training Room. Participants: Sixteen Division III football players participated in this study (age=20.0±1.3 years, height=1.8±0.8 m, weight=91.5±0.95 kg, lifetime football=10.7±2.8 years, college football=2.2±1.3 years). To be eligible, individuals had to miss two or more days of scheduled football practices or competitions due to sport-related injury. All eligible subjects chose to participant. Interventions: Participants were recruited in-person following a sport-related injury. After reading study details and informed consent, participants who opted into the study completed a 5-minute paper survey. The survey included demographic information (e.g. age) and sport history (e.g. years participated). The survey consisted of two previously validated questionnaires, the Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire (FABQ; Cronbach’s Alpha=0.70-0.89) and the Reinjury Anxiety Inventory (RIAI; Cronbach’s Alpha=0.96). The researcher then supplied data regarding each participant’s diagnosis, RTP status, and severity of injury [classified by time loss as mild (<8 >days), moderate (8-21 days) or severe (>21 days)]. Main Outcome Measures: FABQ and RIAI responses can range from 0-84 or 0-45, respectively, and both were calculated as a sum of each question response. RIAI and FABQ scores were analyzed descriptively across the entire cohort. Correlations between RIAI and injury severity, FABQ and injury severity, and RIAI and FABQ were analyzed using Pearson product moment correlations (alpha set a priori as 0.05). Results: The average FABQ score was 50.38±15.12 (range=23–71) and the average RIAI score was 11.63±9.72 (range=0–40). Of the 16 cases reported, 7 were mild, 3 were moderate, and 6 were severe. Types of injuries included: 8 sprains/dislocations, 4 strains/tendon injuries, 2 fractures, 1 concussion and 1 meniscal tear. There was a significant correlation between FABQ and injury severity (r=0.523, P=0.038). However, there was no significant correlation between FABQ and RIAI (r=0.314, P=0.237) or RIAI and injury severity (r=0.226, P=0.399). Conclusions: Normative RIAI and FABQ values have not previously been established in intercollegiate football athletes. The significant correlation between FABQ and injury severity, but not among other comparisons, indicates that the RIAI and FABQ measure unique aspects of RTP fear or anxiety. This may be because the FABQ focuses on the cause of injury while the RIAI focuses on anxiety related to RTP. Word Count: 450

Session Number

PS1

Location

HUB Multipurpose Room

Abstract Number

PS1-k

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COinS
 
Apr 28th, 9:15 AM Apr 28th, 10:45 AM

Injury-related Anxiety as a Psychological Barrier in Return to Play

HUB Multipurpose Room

Injury-related Anxiety as a Psychological Barrier in Return to Play Bartlett OC, Wright CJ: Whitworth University Context: Injury in collegiate athletics is widely accepted as inevitable, and reinjury of the same structure is often an anxiety even after full rehabilitation. Fear of injury, or reinjury, can result in both psychological and physiological changes that can ultimately increase the risk of actual injury. Therefore, it is important to recognize and quantify the psychological aspects of injury when determining individual readiness to return to play (RTP). Objective: The purpose of this research study is to measure fear and/or anxiety regarding reinjury in returning to intercollegiate football participation after sustaining a sport-related injury. Design: Cohort. Setting: Athletic Training Room. Participants: Sixteen Division III football players participated in this study (age=20.0±1.3 years, height=1.8±0.8 m, weight=91.5±0.95 kg, lifetime football=10.7±2.8 years, college football=2.2±1.3 years). To be eligible, individuals had to miss two or more days of scheduled football practices or competitions due to sport-related injury. All eligible subjects chose to participant. Interventions: Participants were recruited in-person following a sport-related injury. After reading study details and informed consent, participants who opted into the study completed a 5-minute paper survey. The survey included demographic information (e.g. age) and sport history (e.g. years participated). The survey consisted of two previously validated questionnaires, the Fear Avoidance Belief Questionnaire (FABQ; Cronbach’s Alpha=0.70-0.89) and the Reinjury Anxiety Inventory (RIAI; Cronbach’s Alpha=0.96). The researcher then supplied data regarding each participant’s diagnosis, RTP status, and severity of injury [classified by time loss as mild (<8>days), moderate (8-21 days) or severe (>21 days)]. Main Outcome Measures: FABQ and RIAI responses can range from 0-84 or 0-45, respectively, and both were calculated as a sum of each question response. RIAI and FABQ scores were analyzed descriptively across the entire cohort. Correlations between RIAI and injury severity, FABQ and injury severity, and RIAI and FABQ were analyzed using Pearson product moment correlations (alpha set a priori as 0.05). Results: The average FABQ score was 50.38±15.12 (range=23–71) and the average RIAI score was 11.63±9.72 (range=0–40). Of the 16 cases reported, 7 were mild, 3 were moderate, and 6 were severe. Types of injuries included: 8 sprains/dislocations, 4 strains/tendon injuries, 2 fractures, 1 concussion and 1 meniscal tear. There was a significant correlation between FABQ and injury severity (r=0.523, P=0.038). However, there was no significant correlation between FABQ and RIAI (r=0.314, P=0.237) or RIAI and injury severity (r=0.226, P=0.399). Conclusions: Normative RIAI and FABQ values have not previously been established in intercollegiate football athletes. The significant correlation between FABQ and injury severity, but not among other comparisons, indicates that the RIAI and FABQ measure unique aspects of RTP fear or anxiety. This may be because the FABQ focuses on the cause of injury while the RIAI focuses on anxiety related to RTP. Word Count: 450