Research Project Title

Are faulty opinion polls to blame for Brexit?

Session Type

Ideas Exchange (Works-in Progress)

Research Project Abstract

Prime Minister David Cameron announced Brexit in an effort to gain support in the 2015 election. The opinion polls were projecting certain defeat of the Conservative party. The hope was to have another coalition government with Liberal Democrats that would stop the Brexit idea in parliament. However, the conservatives won a 12-seat majority which meant they had no excuse not to go forward with Brexit referendum. Cameron relied on opinion polls, but they turned out to be wrong. This research study examines the role of opinion polls in Brexit, the explanation for the polls failure, and the political strategies leading up to Brexit.

Session Number

IE1

Location

Weyerhaeuser 111

Abstract Number

IE1-f

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COinS
 
Apr 28th, 11:00 AM Apr 28th, 12:30 PM

Are faulty opinion polls to blame for Brexit?

Weyerhaeuser 111

Prime Minister David Cameron announced Brexit in an effort to gain support in the 2015 election. The opinion polls were projecting certain defeat of the Conservative party. The hope was to have another coalition government with Liberal Democrats that would stop the Brexit idea in parliament. However, the conservatives won a 12-seat majority which meant they had no excuse not to go forward with Brexit referendum. Cameron relied on opinion polls, but they turned out to be wrong. This research study examines the role of opinion polls in Brexit, the explanation for the polls failure, and the political strategies leading up to Brexit.