Submission Title

What Modern Democracies could Learn from Aristotle

Session Number

SS8B

Location

Weyerhaeuser 304

Abstract Number

SS8B-i

Abstract

The societal understanding of luck, as a veil of ignorance for all circumstances outside the individual’s control or perception, has been grinding at the core of human experience and connection. When the connectedness of events is taken into account the only circumstances examined are those which appear to be relevant to the individual(s) inquiring of these specific events. These would be considered the known knowns which are relevant the individual(s) perception of inquiry. All circumstances outside this perceived relevancy are then tossed into the category of luck. This includes; the unknown knowns (circumstances the individual(s) witness and understand, but do not think relevant), known unknowns (circumstances the individual(s) have witnessed but do not understand), and the unknown unknowns (circumstances which have neither been understood nor witnessed). This type of inquiry leads to a flawed human perception and understanding of the connectedness of things; without a reformation into what this phenomenology represents human understanding will continue engrossed by ignorance.

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Apr 23rd, 3:15 PM Apr 23rd, 4:45 PM

What Modern Democracies could Learn from Aristotle

Weyerhaeuser 304

The societal understanding of luck, as a veil of ignorance for all circumstances outside the individual’s control or perception, has been grinding at the core of human experience and connection. When the connectedness of events is taken into account the only circumstances examined are those which appear to be relevant to the individual(s) inquiring of these specific events. These would be considered the known knowns which are relevant the individual(s) perception of inquiry. All circumstances outside this perceived relevancy are then tossed into the category of luck. This includes; the unknown knowns (circumstances the individual(s) witness and understand, but do not think relevant), known unknowns (circumstances the individual(s) have witnessed but do not understand), and the unknown unknowns (circumstances which have neither been understood nor witnessed). This type of inquiry leads to a flawed human perception and understanding of the connectedness of things; without a reformation into what this phenomenology represents human understanding will continue engrossed by ignorance.