Submission Title

Pilot Test on the Causal Relationship between Perceptions of Control, Green Behaviors, and Attitudes Towards Climate Change

Session Number

SS7

Location

Weyerhaeuser 303

Abstract Number

SS7-e

Abstract

Our research’s purpose is to examine the relationship between eco-friendly behavior, attitude towards climate change, and perceived control. Kitayama et al. (2002) found that there are two distinct human motives, influencing the world and adjusting to the world. These perceptions of control are called primary and secondary locus of control, respectively. Our pilot test’s priming technique involves student pairs who are randomly assigned to be a leader (primary) or a follower (secondary). The follower and leader undergo a matching task that requires the leader to order 12 tangram cards and the follower to replicate the leader’s order by verbal direction. Participants then complete surveys that address influencing and adjusting situations to climate change. We hypothesize that the students primed with a secondary locus of control mindset will be more oriented towards eco-friendly behaviors and receptive to climate change science relative to those primed with a primary control mindset.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Apr 23rd, 1:30 PM Apr 23rd, 3:00 PM

Pilot Test on the Causal Relationship between Perceptions of Control, Green Behaviors, and Attitudes Towards Climate Change

Weyerhaeuser 303

Our research’s purpose is to examine the relationship between eco-friendly behavior, attitude towards climate change, and perceived control. Kitayama et al. (2002) found that there are two distinct human motives, influencing the world and adjusting to the world. These perceptions of control are called primary and secondary locus of control, respectively. Our pilot test’s priming technique involves student pairs who are randomly assigned to be a leader (primary) or a follower (secondary). The follower and leader undergo a matching task that requires the leader to order 12 tangram cards and the follower to replicate the leader’s order by verbal direction. Participants then complete surveys that address influencing and adjusting situations to climate change. We hypothesize that the students primed with a secondary locus of control mindset will be more oriented towards eco-friendly behaviors and receptive to climate change science relative to those primed with a primary control mindset.