Submission Title

Cultural Variations in Using Self as a Reference Point When Choosing Souvenirs For Self and Others

Presenter Information

Kelsey Bajet, Gonzaga University

Session Number

SS7

Location

Weyerhaeuser 303

Abstract Number

SS7-b

Abstract

We conducted an experiment to test how culturally shaped self-concepts affect decision making processes when making choices for self versus others. Individualistic cultures foster distinct self-concepts while collectivistic cultures foster permeable self-concepts. 73 American undergraduates and 32 Japanese undergraduate were recruited. American undergraduates were hypothesized to spend more time looking at items they selected for themselves even when choosing for other people than Japanese undergraduates. Participants looked at souvenirs in macrovariety (variations in categories of souvenirs) and microvariety (variety in one type of souvenir) conditions and were asked to choose a souvenir either for themselves, their friends, their family, or their classmates. Results from an eye-tracking device suggested the hypothesis on the cultural variations in the self as a reference point when making judgments for others was partially supported. Broader implications for how culturally shaped self-concepts affect decision-making processes for self versus various others are discussed.

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Apr 23rd, 1:30 PM Apr 23rd, 3:00 PM

Cultural Variations in Using Self as a Reference Point When Choosing Souvenirs For Self and Others

Weyerhaeuser 303

We conducted an experiment to test how culturally shaped self-concepts affect decision making processes when making choices for self versus others. Individualistic cultures foster distinct self-concepts while collectivistic cultures foster permeable self-concepts. 73 American undergraduates and 32 Japanese undergraduate were recruited. American undergraduates were hypothesized to spend more time looking at items they selected for themselves even when choosing for other people than Japanese undergraduates. Participants looked at souvenirs in macrovariety (variations in categories of souvenirs) and microvariety (variety in one type of souvenir) conditions and were asked to choose a souvenir either for themselves, their friends, their family, or their classmates. Results from an eye-tracking device suggested the hypothesis on the cultural variations in the self as a reference point when making judgments for others was partially supported. Broader implications for how culturally shaped self-concepts affect decision-making processes for self versus various others are discussed.