Submission Title

An Impossible Act: Juggling Evangelism and Social Justice on Missions to Eastern China

Presenter Information

Katharine Jones, Gonzaga University

Session Number

SS3

Location

Weyerhaeuser 304

Abstract Number

SS3-a

Abstract

Throughout the last three hundred years, countless American Protestants have traveled abroad to spread the good news of the gospel. Specifically, many have traveled to Eastern China, facing communism and political and social issues with the intent of allowing Chinese citizens religious freedom. These missionaries have voluntarily taken on additional roles in such as doctors, board members, diplomats to promote social justice. Although they were effective social justice workers, it appears very challenging to balance being a religious missionary and promoting social justice. This is reflected by the experiences of Protestants Peter Parker, M.D. and E.C. Bridgman of the 19th century and Nina Braddock of the 21st century. Solving large social issues generally involves unpopular revolutionary work, whereas conversion involves advertising appealing and inclusive ideas. I fear that as long as Protestant Christians go on missions to eastern China, they will struggle to balance spreading their faith and combating injustice.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Apr 23rd, 9:00 AM Apr 23rd, 10:30 AM

An Impossible Act: Juggling Evangelism and Social Justice on Missions to Eastern China

Weyerhaeuser 304

Throughout the last three hundred years, countless American Protestants have traveled abroad to spread the good news of the gospel. Specifically, many have traveled to Eastern China, facing communism and political and social issues with the intent of allowing Chinese citizens religious freedom. These missionaries have voluntarily taken on additional roles in such as doctors, board members, diplomats to promote social justice. Although they were effective social justice workers, it appears very challenging to balance being a religious missionary and promoting social justice. This is reflected by the experiences of Protestants Peter Parker, M.D. and E.C. Bridgman of the 19th century and Nina Braddock of the 21st century. Solving large social issues generally involves unpopular revolutionary work, whereas conversion involves advertising appealing and inclusive ideas. I fear that as long as Protestant Christians go on missions to eastern China, they will struggle to balance spreading their faith and combating injustice.