Submission Title

Addressing the 'Leak' in the STEM Pipeline: Examining Where and Why the United States' Education System is Losing STEM Students

Presenter Information

Amy Hooper, Whitworth University

Session Number

RS9

Location

Robinson 141

Abstract Number

RS9-f

Abstract

There is a clear need throughout the United States for more workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. In addition, employers from a growing pool of industries are searching for people who possess many STEM skills, regardless of whether their particular industry lies directly within one of these fields. The nation’s economic growth and global competitiveness are also directly affected by the presence and success of STEM industries. Despite an abundance of funding, incentives and creative programs, the number of STEM graduates in the U.S. has not sufficiently increased to fill projected job openings in the near future. This research paper examines where the U.S. is losing students along the STEM pipeline and why. Research indicates that STEM support for students must extend well beyond high school in order to increase the number of STEM-degree graduates this country produces. This paper concludes with suggestions for expanded student support.

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Apr 23rd, 1:30 PM Apr 23rd, 3:00 PM

Addressing the 'Leak' in the STEM Pipeline: Examining Where and Why the United States' Education System is Losing STEM Students

Robinson 141

There is a clear need throughout the United States for more workers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. In addition, employers from a growing pool of industries are searching for people who possess many STEM skills, regardless of whether their particular industry lies directly within one of these fields. The nation’s economic growth and global competitiveness are also directly affected by the presence and success of STEM industries. Despite an abundance of funding, incentives and creative programs, the number of STEM graduates in the U.S. has not sufficiently increased to fill projected job openings in the near future. This research paper examines where the U.S. is losing students along the STEM pipeline and why. Research indicates that STEM support for students must extend well beyond high school in order to increase the number of STEM-degree graduates this country produces. This paper concludes with suggestions for expanded student support.