Mechanical Properties Effects from Exposure to Gaseous Hydrogen for Titanium-based Structural Alloys

Alexander Meyer, Gonzaga University

Abstract

Titanium alloys in general have many advantages as a material choice for structural applications. Some of the favorable properties include good strength-to-weight ratio, good high temperature strength and good corrosion resistance. In proposed automotive design applications, titanium may be a material of choice for future hydrogen powered vehicles due the favorable structural properties. To study the effect of gaseous hydrogen exposure on titanium alloys, dogbone tensile specimens and bending fatigue specimens for different titanium alloys will be exposed to 1 atm hydrogen for one week. The effect of subtle hydrogen exposure levels will be investigated by comparing tensile test and bending fatigue test results following different hydrogen exposure conditions and for different test parameters. Because different titanium alloys react differently to hydrogen (for example, some systems are favorable for hydride formation), at least three different common titanium structural alloys are being investigated.

 
Apr 23rd, 10:45 AM Apr 23rd, 12:15 PM

Mechanical Properties Effects from Exposure to Gaseous Hydrogen for Titanium-based Structural Alloys

Robinson 210

Titanium alloys in general have many advantages as a material choice for structural applications. Some of the favorable properties include good strength-to-weight ratio, good high temperature strength and good corrosion resistance. In proposed automotive design applications, titanium may be a material of choice for future hydrogen powered vehicles due the favorable structural properties. To study the effect of gaseous hydrogen exposure on titanium alloys, dogbone tensile specimens and bending fatigue specimens for different titanium alloys will be exposed to 1 atm hydrogen for one week. The effect of subtle hydrogen exposure levels will be investigated by comparing tensile test and bending fatigue test results following different hydrogen exposure conditions and for different test parameters. Because different titanium alloys react differently to hydrogen (for example, some systems are favorable for hydride formation), at least three different common titanium structural alloys are being investigated.