Submission Title

Presenting Biological Research Data in a Web-Based Format/ A Key to Open-Source Research

Presenter Information

Michael Arnold, Whitworth University

Session Number

RS15

Location

Weyerhaeuser 303

Abstract Number

RS15-e

Abstract

When you first open up your browser what is the first website you visit? Facebook? Google? Bing? Have you ever stopped yourself to think why? Or better yet what makes that particular website you love so much worth visiting in the first place? Is there such a thing as “the” perfect website? Now taking that premise, what if you are a scientist searching for new ideas or fresh perspectives? Or what if you need help analyzing data collected, what do you turn to? In group research and even individual research, the spreading of ideas and collecting peer input can be a strenuous task. There are large biological databases out there such as NCBI and Uniprot, however none are used for the sole purpose of sharing information about research to spark interest or help further others research. How do I get people excited to share their ideas? The INTERNET of course! However, before I can start, I have to delve into the question of ``What makes a website successful? I will study what makes a biological database and website useful and looking at how an open community type database would be useful in contributing to furthering other people’s research. More specifically I will be applying these concepts and constructing a website, based on the Zebra fish study preformed this summer, for our biology team and the affiliated research teams. This website will be built upon the Acquia and Drupal framework and ultimately will be creating a place for ideas and data to be openly shared and analyzed among the community.

This document is currently not available here.

COinS
 
Apr 23rd, 3:15 PM Apr 23rd, 4:45 PM

Presenting Biological Research Data in a Web-Based Format/ A Key to Open-Source Research

Weyerhaeuser 303

When you first open up your browser what is the first website you visit? Facebook? Google? Bing? Have you ever stopped yourself to think why? Or better yet what makes that particular website you love so much worth visiting in the first place? Is there such a thing as “the” perfect website? Now taking that premise, what if you are a scientist searching for new ideas or fresh perspectives? Or what if you need help analyzing data collected, what do you turn to? In group research and even individual research, the spreading of ideas and collecting peer input can be a strenuous task. There are large biological databases out there such as NCBI and Uniprot, however none are used for the sole purpose of sharing information about research to spark interest or help further others research. How do I get people excited to share their ideas? The INTERNET of course! However, before I can start, I have to delve into the question of ``What makes a website successful? I will study what makes a biological database and website useful and looking at how an open community type database would be useful in contributing to furthering other people’s research. More specifically I will be applying these concepts and constructing a website, based on the Zebra fish study preformed this summer, for our biology team and the affiliated research teams. This website will be built upon the Acquia and Drupal framework and ultimately will be creating a place for ideas and data to be openly shared and analyzed among the community.