Submission Title

The Effects of a Strengths-Focused Approach on Paternalistic Prejudice in Volunteers

Presenter Information

Ellie Probus, Whitworth University

Session Number

RS12

Location

Robinson 210

Abstract Number

RS12-d

Abstract

Well-meaning but harmful paternalistic prejudices arise from judging an outgroup as being low in competence and high in warmth. Researchers hypothesized that individuals who had completed volunteer work and focused on the strengths of their aid recipients would judge that population as more competent, while those who focused on weaknesses would do the opposite. Researchers also studied the effects of strengths focus on judgments of warmth. Undergraduate volunteers (n=170, 127 females, 39 males, 4 other) were assigned to focus on strengths, weaknesses, or neither, and then rated their populations on competence and warmth. Results showed no significant differences between groups in overall judgments of competence or warmth. Findings suggest that short-term priming may be insufficient to alter stereotypes.

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Apr 23rd, 3:15 PM Apr 23rd, 4:45 PM

The Effects of a Strengths-Focused Approach on Paternalistic Prejudice in Volunteers

Robinson 210

Well-meaning but harmful paternalistic prejudices arise from judging an outgroup as being low in competence and high in warmth. Researchers hypothesized that individuals who had completed volunteer work and focused on the strengths of their aid recipients would judge that population as more competent, while those who focused on weaknesses would do the opposite. Researchers also studied the effects of strengths focus on judgments of warmth. Undergraduate volunteers (n=170, 127 females, 39 males, 4 other) were assigned to focus on strengths, weaknesses, or neither, and then rated their populations on competence and warmth. Results showed no significant differences between groups in overall judgments of competence or warmth. Findings suggest that short-term priming may be insufficient to alter stereotypes.