Submission Title

The Effects of a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Meditation Regimen on the Physiological Stress Response of College Students

Session Number

PS1

Location

Graves Gym

Abstract Number

PS1-x

Abstract

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), a form of meditation, has been shown to decrease the physiological acute stress response. We hypothesized that a seven day modified practice of MBSR would decrease the physiological stress response of college students. Stress response was measured in terms of heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, salivary cortisol concentration, and positive and negative affect scores, a measure of the subjects’ subjective experience of stress. Data collected in this study was not found to be statistically significant, but several interesting trends were noted. Results were mixed, suggesting that increases in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and negative affect may be buffered by meditation, while meditation appears to inhibit a decrease in heart rate following exposure to a stressor. Finally, meditation may cause an increase in positive affect and a decrease in salivary cortisol concentration after experiencing a stressful event. The lack of statistical significance in this study may be due to sampling error and the abridged version of MBSR administered.

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Apr 23rd, 10:45 AM Apr 23rd, 12:15 PM

The Effects of a Mindfulness-based Stress Reduction Meditation Regimen on the Physiological Stress Response of College Students

Graves Gym

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR), a form of meditation, has been shown to decrease the physiological acute stress response. We hypothesized that a seven day modified practice of MBSR would decrease the physiological stress response of college students. Stress response was measured in terms of heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, salivary cortisol concentration, and positive and negative affect scores, a measure of the subjects’ subjective experience of stress. Data collected in this study was not found to be statistically significant, but several interesting trends were noted. Results were mixed, suggesting that increases in systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure and negative affect may be buffered by meditation, while meditation appears to inhibit a decrease in heart rate following exposure to a stressor. Finally, meditation may cause an increase in positive affect and a decrease in salivary cortisol concentration after experiencing a stressful event. The lack of statistical significance in this study may be due to sampling error and the abridged version of MBSR administered.