Submission Title

The Effects of a Direct Instruction Model, Lead, Test Counting Procedure on Mastery of Rote Counting by a Preschool Student with a Developmental Delay

Presenter Information

Rachel Hallett, Gonzaga University

Session Number

PS1

Location

Graves Gym

Abstract Number

PS1-h

Abstract

This study’s purpose evaluated the effects of the Model-Lead-Test teaching procedure on mastery of rote counting by a preschool student with a developmental delay in a Special Education Integrated preschool classroom. The participant was a four-year-old boy. Event recording within a changing criterion design was used to measure the effects of the Model-Lead-Test teaching procedure on the accuracy and speed of rote counting. The target behavior was correctly saying the numbers while rote counting one through ten within thirty seconds. The intervention consisted of the researcher first modeling and leading the participant through a number’s sequence. Then the participant counted independently and finally a correction procedure was implemented as needed. At the end of the study, the participant made clear improvement from 4 to 20 due to the successful results of a Model-Lead-Test intervention procedure.

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Apr 23rd, 10:45 AM Apr 23rd, 12:15 PM

The Effects of a Direct Instruction Model, Lead, Test Counting Procedure on Mastery of Rote Counting by a Preschool Student with a Developmental Delay

Graves Gym

This study’s purpose evaluated the effects of the Model-Lead-Test teaching procedure on mastery of rote counting by a preschool student with a developmental delay in a Special Education Integrated preschool classroom. The participant was a four-year-old boy. Event recording within a changing criterion design was used to measure the effects of the Model-Lead-Test teaching procedure on the accuracy and speed of rote counting. The target behavior was correctly saying the numbers while rote counting one through ten within thirty seconds. The intervention consisted of the researcher first modeling and leading the participant through a number’s sequence. Then the participant counted independently and finally a correction procedure was implemented as needed. At the end of the study, the participant made clear improvement from 4 to 20 due to the successful results of a Model-Lead-Test intervention procedure.